Mãe Só Há Uma [Don’t Call Me Son] (2016)

Mãe Só Há Uma (literally: You Only Have One Mother)
Director: Anna Muylaert
Writer: Anna Muylaert
Cast: Naomi NeroDaniel BotelhoDani NefussiMatheus NachtergaeleLais DiasLuciana PaesHelena AlbergariaLuciano BortoluzziJune DantasRenan Tenca
Part of: identities Festival
Seen on: 14.6.2017
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Plot:
Pierre (Naomi Nero) gets along well with his mom Aracy (Dani Nefussi) and his sister Jaqueline (Lais Dias). He spends most of his time with his band, taking advantage of the small bit of fame by having lots of sex with both boys and girls, while working out his (gender) identity. But then Pierre is informed that Aracy, the woman he has always known as his mother, actually stole him from Gloria (Dani Nefussi) and Matheus (Matheus Nachtergaele), and she stole his sister, too. As Gloria and Matheus try to reconnect with their son – who they insist on calling Felipe – Pierre can’t accept this new version of his family.

Mãe Só Há Uma tells a pretty incredible story with a lot of sensitivity and insight. It’s sometimes a little long and the ending felt a little frustrating, but it’s definitely worth it regardless.

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Quanto Dura o Amor? [Paulista] (2009)

[First film I saw at the Identities Festival, Vienna’s queer film festival.]

Quanto Dura o Amor? [which literally translates to “How Long Does Love Last?”] is the newest film by Roberto Moreira, written by himself and Anna Muylaert, starring Maria Clara Spinelli, Silvia Lourenço, Danni Carlos and Fábio Herford.

Plot:
Aspiring actress Marina (Silvia Lourenço) leaves her boyfried behind to move to São Paulo and try her luck there. She stays with Suzana (Maria Clara Spinelli), a successful lawyer who just started dating her colleague Gil (Gustavo Machado). On her first evening, Marina goes partying together with her neighbor Jay (Fábio Herford), a socially awkward writer in love with prostitute Michelle (Leilah Moreno). Marina meets the enigmatic singer Justine (Danni Carlos) and immediately falls in love with her.

Paulista is divided in three stories, one I couldn’t care less about (Jay and Michelle), one that was okay (Marina and Justine) and one that was excellent (Suzana and Gil). Unfortunately the film mostly focusses on the Marina, so it ends up being only nice where it could have been really great.


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