All the Money in the World (2017)

All the Money in the World
Director: Ridley Scott
Writer: David Scarpa
Based on: John Pearson‘s non-fiction book Painfully Rich: the Outrageous Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty
Cast: Michelle Williams, Christopher Plummer, Mark Wahlberg, Romain Duris, Timothy Hutton, Charlie Plummer
Seen on: 1.3.2018
1-gif-review

Plot:
John Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer), grandson of Jean Paul Getty (Christopher Plummer), one of the richest men in the world, is abducted. Despite his wealth, Jean Paul Getty is unwilling to pay the ransom, much to the horror of his daughter-in-law Gail (Michelle Williams), mother of John Paul. Instead he sends his security specialist Fletcher (Mark Wahlberg) to oversee things. But as time is running out for the teenager, both Gail and Fletcher get ever more desperate.

All the Money in the World is based on real-life events that happened before my time and I had never heard of the story. But it really is a horrible and in parts mind-boggling story that the film tells mostly well. Nevertheless, it didn’t win me over completely.

Continue reading

The Dinner (2017)

The Dinner
Director: Oren Moverman
Writer: Oren Moverman
Based on: Herman Koch‘s novel
Cast: Richard GereLaura LinneySteve CooganRebecca HallChloë SevignyMichael ChernusCharlie PlummerSeamus Davey-FitzpatrickMiles J. Harvey
Seen on: 20.6.2017
1-gif-review

Plot:
Paul (Steve Coogan), a history teacher, and his wife Claire (Laura Linney) are meeting Paul’s brother Stan (Richard Gere), a successful politician, and his second wife Katelyn (Rebecca Hall) for dinner. Paul obviously doesn’t want to go, he doesn’t actually like Stan a lot and he’s struggling with his mental health. But something happened that involves Paul and Claire’s son, as well as Stan’s kids from his first marriage. And the four present parents need to decide what to do about what happened.

The Dinner managed to completely dismantle white, rich privilege without ever leaving the privileged perspective. Nothing in this film is okay, but it is worth looking at the issues exactly because of that.

Continue reading