Ashes of the Firebird (Amy Kuivalainen)

Ashes of the Firebird is the second novel in the Firebird Faerie Tales series by Amy Kuivalainen.
Finished on: 27.6.2022
[Here’s my review of the first novel.]
[I won this book in a LibraryThing Early Reviewer give-away.]

Plot:
After recent events, Anya and her allies are regrouping in Budapest. Anya herself is unconscious, as her spirit is trapped in the Land of Dreaming with her grandmother Yanka, and unable to find its way back to its body. As her friends try everything to get her back, things around them start to look more and more like a war is coming – a war that could potentially involve the entire supernatural world.

Ashes of the Firebird was a good read that drew me right back into this rather sprawling world, even though I didn’t quite remember all the things about the earlier novel. While there are still some things for me to criticize, I definitely liked more about it than I didn’t like. I’m glad I continued reading the series.

The book cover showing a stylized silver bird on a dark gray background.
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Cry of the Firebird (Amy Kuivalainen)

Cry of the Firebird is the first novel in the Firebird Faerie Tales series by Amy Kuivalainen.
Finished on: 5.8.2021
[I won this book in a LibraryThing Early Reviewer give-away.]

Content Note: fatmisia, racial slur (g*psy)

Plot:
Anya grew up right on the Russian-Finnish border with her grandfather. But he just passed away, and Anya is still reeling from the loss, and doesn’t really know where to go from here. An option she didn’t expect was that Tuoni, Finnish God of the dead would show up in person to leave her with hints about a magical world that her grandfather was somehow part of. And that Anya needs to become part of, too, and quickly before dark forces crosses through the border from Skazki – the border her grandfather maintained. The border she should be maintaining now. Fortunately Tuoni leaves her with a gift from her grandfather, and Anya soon finds not only danger, but also allies.

I really liked the setting of Cry of the Firebird, which was a bit like I thought the Grishaverse would be before I read it. The story didn’t work that well for me, though – but I do see potential that this series could grow.

The book cover showing a stylized silver firebird on a blue, starry background.
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