Misbehaviour (2020)

Misbehaviour
Director: Philippa Lowthorpe
Writer: Rebecca Frayn, Gaby Chiappe
Cast: Keira Knightley, Jessie Buckley, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Ruby Bentall, Lily Newmark, Maya Kelly, Loreece Harrison, Suki Waterhouse, Clara Rosager, John Heffernan, Rhys Ifans, Keeley Hawes, Phyllis Logan, Greg Kinnear, Lesley Manville
Seen on: 14.10.2020

Content Note: (critical treatment of) sexism, racism

Plot:
Sally Alexander (Keira Knightley) is active in the women’s group on her campus and struggles against the sexist condecension she encounters every day. Through that group she also meets Jo (Jessie Buckley) who has a more radical approach to feminism and doesn’t mind a little rule-breaking here and there – the system needs to be overthrown, after all. Sally is taken aback by Jo’s brash manner at first, but she is also drawn to her and her group. When they start to plan a big protest against the Miss World pageant, Sally joins in. Meanwhile, the Miss World preparations are going strong, especially after they had to face some criticism in the past few years. Among the contestants is Jennifer Hosten, Miss Grenada (Gugu Mbatha-Raw), who is hoping to win, as unlikely as that is for a Black woman.

Misbehaviour tries many things, and with most things it is rather successful in its attempt to marry light-hearted comedy with complicated political and feminist issues.It’s both fun and gratifying to watch.

The film poster showing Jennifer Hosten (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) seated on a throne, Sally (Keira Knightley) and Jo (Jessie Buckley) in front of her and Dolores Hope (Leslie Manville), Eric Morley (Rhys Ifans), Julia Morley (Keeley Hawes) and Bob Hope (Greg Kinnear) behind them.
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Re-Watch: Unknown (2006)

Unknown
Director: Simon Brand
Writer: Matthew Waynee
Cast: Jim Caviezel, Greg Kinnear, Jeremy Sisto, Barry Pepper, Joe Pantoliano, Bridget Moynahan, Peter Stormare, Chris Mulkey, Clayne Crawford, Kevin Chapman, Mark Boone Junior

Plot:
Five men wake up one by one in a locked warehouse. None of them can remember who they are or how they got there. The first to wake up is Jean Jacket (Jim Caviezel). As he looks around he sees a guy with a broken nose (Greg Kinnear), one tied to a chair (Joe Pantoliano), one handcuffed to a rail in obviously very hurt (Jeremy Sisto) and one apparently simply passed out (Barry Pepper). While everybody else is still out cold, Jean Jacket wanders around and receives a phone call through which he fakes his way through. But it is obvious that something shifty is going on and Jean Jacket and everybody else have to figure out what it is and what side they’re on.

I started this movie under the impression that I hadn’t seen it before, but about five minutes in I realized that I had, actually. I couldn’t remember practically anything about it, though – it’s that kind of a movie.

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