Tenet (2020)

Tenet
Director: Christopher Nolan
Writer: Christopher Nolan
Cast: John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Kenneth Branagh, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Clémence Poésy, Fiona Dourif, Michael Caine, Himesh Patel, Dimple Kapadia
Seen on: 31.8.2020

Plot:
A special operative (John David Washington) is captured in a mission that goes very wrong. He manages to swallow a suicide pill – only to wake up recruited for a very special program. A program he knows nothing about except that there is something weird going on with time and he has one code word to find information: Tenet. Things soon point him to arms dealer Andrei Sator (Kenneth Branagh) and his wife Kat (Elizabeth Debicki) – but that’s only the beginning.

Nolan has made some good movies, but Tenet isn’t one of them. It’s pretty much incomprehensible drivel that’s much too preoccupied with its own coolness. If you’re looking for an example of style over substance: this is it.

The film poster showing the Protagonist (John David Washington) twice, mirrored along a diagonal line, once facing forward, once backward, once wearing a suit, once a uniform. Both times he is aiming a gun.
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BlacKkKlansman (2018)

BlacKkKlansman
Director: Spike Lee
Writer: Charlie Wachtel, David Rabinowitz, Kevin Willmott, Spike Lee
Based on: Ron Stallworth‘s memoir Black Klansman
Cast: John David Washington, Adam Driver, Laura Harrier, Topher Grace, Alec Baldwin, Isiah Whitlock Jr., Robert John Burke, Brian Tarantina, Arthur J. Nascarella, Ken Garito, Frederick Weller, Michael Buscemi, Harry Belafonte, Gina Belafonte
Seen on: 21.8.2018

Plot:
Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) fought his way into the police force – and managed to become the first black police man in Colorado Springs. That doesn’t mean that his skills are particularly valued. But as Ron keeps pushing, he is assigned to go undercover to black power events like the talk by Kwame Ture. But Ron knows where the real threat lies: with the Ku Klux Klan. Making a couple of bold choices and forcing some hands, he ends up infiltrating the Klan via phone, sending his Jewish colleague Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) to go to the meetings in person.

BlacKkKlansman is a strong film that makes its political point eloquently and forcefully. And it’s an important point to make – made by a good story.

The film poster showing a black man in a Ku Klux Klan mask, making a black power fist and holding up a comb.
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