John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

John Wick: Chapter 2
Director: Chad Stahelski
Writer: Derek Kolstad
Sequel to: John Wick
Cast: Keanu Reeves, Riccardo Scamarcio, Ian McShane, Ruby Rose, Common, Claudia Gerini, Lance Reddick, Laurence Fishburne, Tobias Segal, John Leguizamo, Bridget Moynahan, Thomas Sadoski, Erik Frandsen, David Patrick Kelly, Perry Yung, Peter Serafinowicz, Peter Stormare
Seen on: 22.2.2017

Plot:
After John Wick (Keanu Reeves) finished his quest of vengeance and made sure that there will be no continuation of a blood feud, all he wants is to get back to his life of peace and quiet. But his reappearance in the world of assassins hasn’t gone unnoticed and there is still a debt John owes to Santino (Riccardo Scarmarcio) – and Santino has come to collect. John wants to refuse, but if he does, he goes against one of the central principles of this world – and his life will be up for grabs.

John Wick: Chapter 2 may not have blown me away quite as much as the first film (which may be due mostly to my higher expectations now), but it is definitely a more than worthy sequel.

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Burnt (2015)

Burnt
Director: John Wells
Writer: Steven Knight
Cast: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Daniel Brühl, Riccardo Scamarcio, Omar Sy, Sam Keeley, Henry Goodman, Matthew Rhys, Stephen Campbell Moore, Emma Thompson, Uma Thurman, Alicia Vikander, Lily James
Seen on: 16.12.2015

Plot:
Adam (Bradley Cooper) was the rising star in the cooking world before alcohol and drugs got the better of him. When his career was completely destroyed (plus the career of some of his friends for good measure), he set himself  the penance of shucking a million oysters. Three years later he is sober and as he reaches the final oyster, he is ready to give his career a new start. Activating all his old connections and bullying himself into a restaurant kitchen, he is ready to get that third Michelin star.

Burnt is a film about an asshole that for some reason is be believed the coolest person on the planet. The best that I can say about it is that it’s watchable and the cast is good. Other than that, though, I was mostly annoyed by it.

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Mine vaganti [Loose Cannons] (2010)

Loose Cannons is the newest movie by Ferzan Ozpetek, starring Riccardo Scamarcio, Nicole Grimaudo and Alessandro Preziosi.

Plot:
A while ago, Tommaso (Riccardo Scamarcio) moved from his small home town to Rome, started to study literature (instead of economics) and got himself a boyfriend (instead of a girlfriend). All without the knowledge of his family, of course. But he finally decided to come clean with his family. But before he can come out of the closet, his brother Antonio (Alessandro Preziosi) beats him to it with his own coming out, triggering a heart-attack in their father and suddenly, Tommaso is stuck with taking care of the family business and the family itself – and still nobody knows about him.

Summer in the cinema; and all you get to see are sweet, funny but ultimately inconsequential movies. At least, that’s what it feels like sometimes – and Loose Cannons won’t make you feel any differently. Still, it’s entertaining and you can do much worse than to spend your time with it.

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Brothers

I saw Mio fratello è figlio unico or, in English, My Brother Is An Only Child. [Before you wonder, no, I don’t really speak Italian, my holiday stuttering really is not good enough to watch a movie in Italian. I saw it in German.]

It’s the story of two brothers in the 60s/70s, the older one a communist, the younger one a fascist. But their differences don’t stop there.

Manrico, the communist, is a ladies’ man (and Riccardo Scamarcio definitely looks the part…), he’s wild, unreliable, charming and never really lets anybody close.
Accio (Elio Germano), on the other hand, is shy, hot-tempered, loves Latin, has a strong sense of right and wrong and always wears his heart on his fingertips.

They live together with their parents and their sister in a small, crumbling flat in Latina. They fight a lot, but in the end, they get along. Then one day, Francesca shows up, Manrico’s newest girlfriend and also a communist, and Accio falls in love with her…

The film follows the family throughout 2 decades, shows their ups and downs, their struggle for survival and for meaning.

It’s a wonderful film. Extremely well acted with an engaging story. It has an end, which surprises and leaves room for your own interpretation (a beautiful ending, by the way) and it doesn’t “sell” you any morale.

Although it gets long sometimes, it never gets boring, and I can definitely recommend it.