Gimme Danger (2016)

Gimme Danger
Director: Jim Jarmusch
Writer: Jim Jarmusch
Part of: Viennale
Seen on: 27.10.2016

“Plot”:
Gimme Danger looks at the history of Iggy Pop and The Stooges, mostly through the eyes and words of Iggy Pop himself.

I admit that apart from a generally favorable impression of him being a nice guy and Ewan McGregor swinging his dick on stage in Velvet Goldmine, I don’t really have much connection with Iggy Pop, his band or their music. I decided to watch this documentary mostly because it was made by Jim Jarmusch. And as an introductory film to the music and Iggy Pop as a person, it works really well.

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Paterson (2016)

Paterson
Director: Jim Jarmusch
Writer: Jim Jarmusch
Cast: Adam Driver, Golshifteh Farahani, Rizwan Manji, Method Man, William Jackson Harper, Chasten Harmon, Barry Shabaka HenleyMasatoshi Nagase
Part of: Viennale
Seen on: 22.10.2016

Plot:
Paterson (Adam Driver) is a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey, and likes to write poetry in his spare time. His girlfriend Laura (Golshifteh Farahani) champions him and his art, as he does his best to support her in her music and her projects that mostly involve black and white decoration. Their life is quiet and full of routines, but even so, they have their ups and downs.

Paterson is such a wonderfully warm film, I left the cinema floating on cloud number 9 like after a really good first date (only I never had a first date that left me feeling quite like this). It’s a love letter to poetry and to Paterson, NJ, and it sees and shows the beauty of the everyday so clearly, I felt nothing but love for it.

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Behind Jim Jarmusch (2010) + Travelling at Night with Jim Jarmusch (2014)

Behind Jim Jarmusch + Travelling at Night with Jim Jarmusch
Director: Léa Rinaldi
Writer: Léa Rinaldi
“Cast”: Jim JarmuschIsaach De BankoléJohn Hurt, Bill MurrayTilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska
Part of: Viennale
Seen on: 31.10.2015

“Plot”:
Both Behind Jim Jarmusch and Travelling at Night with Jim Jarmusch are documentaries about the creative process of director Jim Jarmusch. Rinaldi followed Jarmusch during the shot of The Limits of Control and then again a couple of years later during the work on Only Lovers Left Alive, trying to grasp how Jarmusch gets to work.

Behind Jim Jarmusch was Rinaldi’s first documentary and you can see how much she learned, so that Travelling at Night with Jim Jarmusch becomes the much better film. But both are interesting to see, especially if you like Jim Jarmusch’s films as they give you a look into the creation of something special.

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Re-Watch: Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

Only Lovers Left Alive
Director: Jim Jarmusch
Writer: Jim Jarmusch
Cast: Tom Hiddleston, Tilda Swinton, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt, Anton Yelchin, Jeffrey Wright, Slimane Dazi
[Here’s my first review.]

Plot:
Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton) have been a couple since about forever. And since they’re vampires that really is a long time. But recently they lived seperately – Adam in Detroit and Eve in Tangier. Adam is struggling with depression, so Eve comes to join him in Detroit. Their happy bubble is burst, though, when Eve’s volatile sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska) comes to visit as well.

I don’t know when the last time was that I saw a movie in the cinema twice. But Only Lovers Left Alive had to be watched again, now it got its regular release here and so I did. And it was still brilliant.

only-lovers-left-alive

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Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

Only Lovers Left Alive
Director: Jim Jarmusch
Writer: Jim Jarmusch
Cast: Tom Hiddleston, Tilda Swinton, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt, Anton Yelchin, Jeffrey Wright, Slimane Dazi
Part of: surprise movie of this year’s Viennale

Plot:
Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton) have been a couple since about forever. And since they’re vampires that really is a long time. But recently they lived seperately – Adam in Detroit and Eve in Tangier. Adam is struggling with depression, so Eve comes to join him in Detroit. Their happy bubble is burst, though, when Eve’s volatile sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska) comes to visit as well.

I’ve been looking forward to this movie ever since the words “Tilda Swinton Tom Hiddleston Jim Jarmusch Vampires” were mentioned together, so I was absolutely ecstatic when the opening credits at the surprise screening started rolling and I identified the film. And I’m happy to say that it fulfilled all my expectations and more.

only-lovers-left-alive

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Stranger Than Paradise (1984)

[The movie was part of the road movie special at the Filmmuseum.]

Stranger Than Paradise is a film written and directed by Jim Jarmusch and starring John Lurie, Eszter Balint, Richard Edson and Cecillia Stark.

Plot:
Willie (John Lurie) lives in New York and gets by on more or less legal endeavors together with his friends Eddie (Richard Edson). One day he gets a visit from his Hungarian cousin Eva (Eszter Balint). And Eddie is immediately smitten. After Eva leaves, Willie and Eddie get some money from betting on horses and they decide to travel and visit Eva in Cleveland in turn.

Weird, weirder, Jim Jarmusch. Stranger Than Paradise is Jim Jarmusch’s first big film and it already has all the trademarks of his work. I guess you have to like his style. I do and I loved the film.

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The Limits of Control (2009)

The Limits of Control is Jim Jarmusch‘s newest movie, starring Isaach de Bankolé, Tilda Swinton, John Hurt, Gael García Bernal and Bill Murray.

Plot:
The story follows a man (Isaac de Bankolé) doing a job, which doesn’t seem to be entirely legal. As he meets informant after informant to get yet another bit of information to complete his task, you get long almost-monologues by the informants and a mysterious naked woman (Paz de la Huerta) in the man’s bed.

It’s been way too long since Jim Jarmusch made a movie. But as long as the rare ones keep on coming and keep on being this good, I almost don’t mind.
The Limits of Control is definitely one of Jarmusch’s stranger movies. It doesn’t seem totally settled in this reality (though nothing magical/supernatural happens). The performances are – as was to be expected – exquisit, the dia-/monologues great and the story actually rather unimportant (though I was still very curious to know what happens). If you like slow and weird movies, this one’s for you.

the-limits-of-control-01

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Western Motel: Edward Hopper and Contemporary Art

Western Motel: Edward Hopper and Contemporary Art is an exhibition in the Kunsthalle Vienna, featuring Edward Hopper (surprise!), David Claerbout [page is in French], Dawn Clements, Jonas Dahlberg, Thomas Demand, Gustav Deutsch [There’s an English button which I can’t get to work. If you can, great, if not, it’s in German], Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Tim Eitel, Jim Jarmusch, Rachel Khedoori, Mark Lewis, Ed Ruscha, Markus Schinwald/Oleg Soulimenko, Jeff Wall, Rachel Whiteread.

[Oh yeah, baby, that’s Jim Jarmusch right there. ;)]

The exhibition concentrates on Hopper’s influence on cinema and his view of architectural space, but it also features photographs working with the same principles as he did in his paintings – people, who are kind of frozen in their loneliness, light that makes the paintings come alive.

It’s very interesting to see the parallels that are drawn between the different artists, who work with very different media – from painting to sculptures, film to print.

It’s a surprisingly short exhibition – even though there are so many different artists, you can comfortably see everything in an hour and a half – which is exactly the amount of time my brain gives me before it goes in information overload mode.

Although I didn’t like all the artists (and let’s be honest, there’s little chance of that because there are just so many of them), I enjoyed myself thoroughly.

[After the break see pictures of the artists’ works.]

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