Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011)

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
Director: Stephen Daldry
Writer: Eric Roth
Based on: Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel
Cast: Thomas Horn, Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Max von Sydow, Zoe Caldwell, John Goodman, Viola Davis, Jeffrey Wright

Plot:
Oskar’s (Thomas Horn) father (Tom Hanks) recently died in the 9/11 attack. Oskar has a hard time coping with it, when he stumbles upon a mysterious key in an envelope with the name “Black” on it in his father’s closet. Oskar decides that he has to find out more and the only logical way to go about it is to talk to every person called Black in New York. So he takes the phone book and starts to visit all of them.

The film is one of the most emotionally manipulative movies I have ever seen. Ever. And I still would have liked it a whole lot, if I hadn’t read the book. But in comparison, the film just leaves a small taste of disappointment.

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Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (Jonathan Safran Foer)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is Jonathan Safran Foer‘s second novel.

Plot:
Oskar’s father recently died in the 9/11 attack. Oskar has a hard time coping with it, when he stumbles upon a mysterious key in an envelope with the name “Black” on it in his father’s closet. Oskar decides that he has to find out more and the only logical way to go about it is to talk to every person called Black in New York. So he takes the phone book and starts to visit all of them.
In the meantime we’re also confronted with the past of Oskar’s family, specifically his grandparents who came to New York from Germany after WW2.

I was worried that this book wouldn’t be as good as Everything Is Illuminated. Especially since all I read about Jonathan Safran Foer recently is how terribly overrated he is. But I really can’t agree with that (though I can see where the accusations of pretentiousness come from. It’s not pretense-free, but it is so in agood way). Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is a wonderful, touching read.

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