Les Chaises [The Chairs] – DNF

[Festwochen.]

The Chairs is a play by Eugène Ionesco. It was directed by Luc Bondy, starring Micha Lescot and Dominique Reymond.

Plot:
An old man (Micha Lescot) and an old woman (Dominique Reymond) are preparing for one last party before they die. The man has something to tell the world, something important. But as the time passes, all that seems to be arriving are imaginary guests and more chairs.

This was actually the first play I ever walked out of before it was finished. Not only that, since there was no break where I could sneak out, I actually made people get up so I could leave. It was honestly completely unbearable.

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Sweet Nothings

It’s Festwochen time again! [For my reviews of last year’s plays, click here.] I got a lot of theatre tickets lined up in the next weeks, so expect a lot of reviews of this stuff.

Sweet Nothings is a new translation of Arthur Schnitzler‘s Liebelei [my review] by David Harrower. The play was produced for the Young Vic in London, directed by Luc Bondy and stars Kate Burdette, Hayley Carmichael, Natalie Dormer, Tom Hughes, Jack Laskey, David Sibley and Andrew Wincott.

Plot:
End of the 19th, early 20th century, Vienna. Fritz (Tom Hughes) and Theodor (Jack Laskey) are best friends, both pretty wealthy but have a very different outlook on life, though both are ultimately jaded. While Dori doesn’t seem to take anything seriously, Fritz is in a rather destructive relationship with a married woman and fears that her husband found out about them and will challenge him to a duel. Dori tries to distract Fritz by introducing him to his current girlfriend Mizi’s (Natalie Dormer) best friend, Christine (Kate Burdette). But Christine really falls in love with Fritz, and quite hard at that. During an evening of partying, the husband actually shows up at Fritz’ place.

Sweet Nothings is an excellent production. The cast is absolutely great. The stage design pretty minimalistic but very effective and I like the play. The only thing that went a little awry was the marketing.

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