Handsome Devil (2016)

Handsome Devil
Director: John Butler
Writer: John Butler
Cast: Fionn O’Shea, Nicholas Galitzine, Andrew Scott, Ardal O’Hanlon, Amy Huberman,
Ruairi O’Connor, Dick O’Leary, Mark Doherty, Michael McElhatton
Seen on: 4.1.2018
1-gif-review

Plot:
Ned (Fionn O’Shea) and Conor (Nicholas Galitzine) attend the same boarding school and are forced to share a room. But other than that they really have nothing in common. Ned is a shy social outcast who can’t even be bothered to pretend to like rugby, while Conor is a star rugby player at their rugby-centered school. Against all odds, they start bonding though. But their friendship doesn’t go uncommented

Handsome Devil is a sweet film that takes on a different direction from what I thought it would. It’s not a fantastic film, but it is an all-around good watch.

[Slight SPOILERS follow]

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King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017)

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Director: Guy Ritchie
Writer: Joby Harold, Guy Ritchie, Lionel Wigram,
Cast: Charlie Hunnam, Astrid Bergès-Frisbey, Jude Law, Djimon Hounsou, Eric Bana, Aidan Gillen, Freddie Fox, Craig McGinlay, Tom WuKatie McGrathDavid BeckhamMichael McElhatton
Seen on: 22.5.2017
1-gif-review [alternate take]

Plot:
When King Uther (Eric Bana) is betrayed by his brother Vortigern (Jude Law), Uther barely manages to get his baby out of the danger zone. The baby grows up to be Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) who has no idea of his family background, but gets a whole lot of street smarts. And then Uther’s sword is uncovered, stuck in a stone. Since it can only be removed by Uther’s son and nobody knows where he is, Vortigern forces all men in the country to give it a try. And nobody is more surprised than Arthur when he is actually able to pull the sword out – a fact that immediately pits him against Vortigern and the powers he commands.

I expected King Arthur to be pretty bad and it was, but it was also a little better than expected. Which is not to say that it’s actually a good film or really worth seeing.

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The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016)

The Autopsy of Jane Doe
Director: André Øvredal
Writer: Ian B. Goldberg, Richard Naing
Cast: Brian Cox, Emile Hirsch, Ophelia Lovibond, Michael McElhatton, Olwen Catherine Kelly
Part of: /slash Filmfestival
Seen on: 6.5.2017
[Review by cornholio.]

Plot:
Tommy (Brian Cox) and his son Austin (Emile Hirsch) work together as coroners. One night, they get the body of a young woman (Olwen Catherine Kelly) that was just found and suspected to be a homicide victim, although there was no clear indication for the cause of her death. As Tommy and Austin get to work quickly, so the police can face the press with an update in the morning, they realize that something is very strange with that body indeed.

The Autopsy of Jane Doe was tense, effective and well-acted – and had such a stupid ending and was so infuriating in its depiction of women that it almost ruined the film entirely for me. But up until those last 20 minutes, I really enjoyed it.

[SPOILERS]

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The Zookeeper’s Wife (2017)

The Zookeeper’s Wife
Director: Niki Caro
Writer: Angela Workman
Based on: Diane Ackerman‘s non-fiction book
Cast: Jessica ChastainJohan HeldenberghDaniel BrühlTimothy RadfordEfrat DorIddo GoldbergShira HaasMichael McElhatton
Seen on: 18.4.2017

Plot:
Antonina Żabińska (Jessica Chastain) and her husband Jan (Johan Heldenbergh) run the Warsaw Zoo together and things have been going well. That is, until the Germans march into Poland in 1939 and turn their lives upside down. Antonina and Jan remain pretty privileged, although their Zoo is taken apart, the rarest animals shipped to the zoo in Berlin run by Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl) and the grounds are used for German soldiers. But once they realize how bad the situation for the Jews in Warsaw is, they start helping in any way they can.

The Zookeeper’s Wife tells a pretty amazing story about exceptional people and will leave no tearduct untouched. I enjoyed it, as much as you can enjoy a film about the holocaust.

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The Hallow (2015)

The Hallow aka The Woods
Director: Corin Hardy
Writer: Felipe Marino, Corin Hardy
Cast: Joseph Mawle, Bojana Novakovic, Michael McElhatton, Gary Lydon, Stuart Graham
Part of: /slash Filmfestival
Seen on: 21.9.2015
[Reviews by cornholio and Maynard.]

Plot:
Adam Hitchens (Joseph Mawle) is a woodsman tasked with assessing the forest in Ireland before it is being privatized. For that he, his wife Clare (Bojana Novakovic) and their baby son moved to a remote cottage in the middle of nowhere. Their only neighbor (Michael McElhatton) keeps telling them to leave and that they should stay away from the forest. What Adam takes as antagonism due to the sale, actually turns out to be an honest warning: there is something living in those woods and it has its own agenda.

The Hallow tells a classic story in a very good way. Especially the creature design was really awesome.

thehallow[Slight SPOILERS]

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Parked (2010)

Parked
Director: Darragh Byrne
Writer: Ciaran Creagh
Cast: Colm Meaney, Colin Morgan, Milka Ahlroth, Stuart Graham, Michael McElhatton

Plot:
Fred (Colm Meaney) spent much of his life working in the UK. When he returns to Ireland, he has nowhere to live but his car. But no address, no benefits and so Fred is stuck, trying to make his life into as much of a normal routine as he can. Until young Cathal (Colin Morgan) parks next to him. Cathal is pretty much constantly high and basically the antithesis to Fred, but somehow they take a shine to each other and Cathal is able to get a bit more movement into Fred’s life.

Parked is not a film that surprises you much. It goes pretty much down the way you’d think. But it tells its story with a lot of sensitivity for its characters and their situation and it has two great lead actors, so you don’t really care that you basically knew the story before seeing it.

parked

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