Mystery Road (2013)

Mystery Road
Director: Ivan Sen
Writer: Ivan Sen
Cast: Aaron Pedersen, Hugo Weaving, Ryan Kwanten, Jack Thompson, Tony Barry, Robert Mammone, Tasma Walton, Damian Walshe-Howling, David Field, Bruce Spence, Jack Charles, Tricia Whitton, Samara Weaving
Part of: We Are One Film Festival
Seen on: 14.6.2020

Plot:
Detective Jay Swan (Aaron Pedersen) returned to his hometown in the Outback just in time to investigate the murder of a young native girl – a murder the white rest of the police force doesn’t seem too interested in. Jay soon starts to suspect that the lack of interest may actually be active hampering from his colleagues, let alone the people around who all saw, heard and know nothing. Including Jay’s own daughter (Tricia Whitton) who doesn’t want anything to do with her father, but who knew the victim.

Mystery Road is atmospheric and Pedersen is a great lead, but I constantly felt like I was missing some context to understand what the fuck was actually happening. While that can make the appeal of a film, in this case, it was completely frustrating for me.

The film poster showing a lone car on a dirt road and the heads of three of the main characters.
Continue reading

Knights of Badassdom (2013)

Knights of Badassdom
Director: Joe Lynch
Writer: Matt WallKevin Dreyfuss
Cast: Ryan KwantenSteve Zahn, Peter DinklageJimmi Simpson, Summer GlauTom HopperJoshua MalinaMargarita Levieva, Danny Pudi
Part of: /slash Filmfestival
[Reviews by cornholio and Maynard Morrissey.]

Plot:
Joe (Ryan Kwanten) was just dumped by his girlfriend Beth (Margarita Levieva) which is why his geeky friends Eric (Steve Zahn) and Hung (Peter Dinklage) drag him off to a LARP. Joe enjoyed playing Dungeons and Dragons a while ago, but he is hesitant about LARPing. It doesn’t help either when it turns out that Eric actually summoned a very real and very murderous demon – and it’s up to them to stop it.

I expected this film to be an ode to LARPing with maybe a bit of friendly ribbing at the idiosyncracies of that particular subculture. But unfortunately Knigths of Badassdom doesn’t laugh with LARPers, it laughs at them – and it isn’t actually very funny.

knightsofbadassdom

[SPOILERS] Continue reading

Griff the Invisible (2010)

Griff the Invisible
Director: Leon Ford
Writer: Leon Ford
Cast: Ryan Kwanten, Maeve Dermody, Patrick Brammall, Toby Schmitz
Part of: /slash Filmfestival

Plot:
Griff (Ryan Kwanten) is a socially awkward office worker who spends his free time pretending to be a superhero and continuously working on ways to become invisible. When his brother Tim (Patrick Brammall) introduces his new girlfriend Melody (Maeve Dermody) [who is trying to walk through walls] to Griff, both Melody and Griff know immediately that they are two of a kind.

Griff the Invisible is a cute film, but it doesn’t make the jump to great. For that, there is too much romanticizing going on for my taste.

Continue reading

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole (2010)

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole is Zack Snyder‘s first animated movie based on Kathryn Lasky‘s novels and stars the voices of Jim Sturgess, Hugo Weaving, Helen Mirren, Geoffrey Rush, Sam Neill, David Wenham, Anthony LaPaglia, Abbie Cornish and Ryan Kwanten.

Plot:
Soren (Jim Sturgess) and his brother Kludd (Ryan Kwanten) are two owls almost ready to leave their nests. Inspired by their attempts to fly, they want to practice more after their parents left for the nightly hunt and promptly fall down the tree. Before they can figure out a way back up, they are snatched up by two owls who bring them to the “True Bloods”*, a group of basically Nazi Owls who abduct young owls to build an army and to harvest something they call flecks; metal flakes that seem to have a magical (and very adverse) effect on owls. While Kludd embraces the True Bloods’ ideology, Soren makes a desperate attempt to find the legendary Guardians of Ga’Hoole: warrior owls sworn to protect other owls.

The movie has a good plot and nice, if a little stereotypical characters (nothing too bad). But most of all, it’s visually absolutely stunning. Here’s a movie that’s actually worth to see in 3D.

Continue reading