Glassland (2014)

Glassland
Director: Gerard Barrett
Writer: Gerard Barrett
Cast: Jack Reynor, Toni Collette, Will Poulter, Michael Smiley, Harry Nagle
Seen on: 2.4.2020

Plot:
John (Jack Reynor) is a taxi driver. He lives with his mother Jean (Toni Collette). Jean is an alcoholic and John doesn’t really know how to take care of her anymore. After he has to bring her to the hospital and the doctors inform him of how bad her state really is, he know that he will have to get her sober. But programs that could help require money, money he doesn’t really have.

Glassland is a small film in the best way: it doesn’t need much to tell its story and it tells it well. Unfortunately, the film steps out of its own perimeter and tries to go big in the end – and that just doesn’t really work. Still, up until that part, it’s very much worth seeing.

The film poster showing Jean (Toni Collette) leaning against John (Jack Reynor), Shane (Will Poulter) standing behind them.
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Midsommar [Midsummer] (2019)

Midsommar
Director: Ari Aster
Writer: Ari Aster
Cast: Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor, Vilhelm Blomgren, William Jackson Harper, Will Poulter, Ellora Torchia, Archie Madekwe, Henrik Norlén, Gunnel Fred
Seen on: 22.8.2019
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Content Note: ableism, saneism, suicide

Plot:
Dani (Florence Pugh) and Christian (Jack Reynor) have been dating for a while, though their relationship isn’t exactly good anymore. But Christian feels he can’t break up with Dani after a tragedy in her family. When Christian is invited to a midsummer festival in Sweden by his Swedish friend Pelle (Vilhelm Blomgren), he plans on going with his friends Josh (William Jackson Harper) and Mark (Will Poulter). Dani invites herself along, not exactly to Christian’s joy. But the change of scenery seems to do them some good, at least until the festival takes a distinct turn for the weird.

Midosmmar is probably the worst case scenario for a break-up but a really cool film. I did have some issues with it, but overall, I really liked it.

The film poster showing a close-up of half of Dani's (Florence Pugh) face. She is wearing a flower crown and crying.
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Black Mirror: Bandersnatch (2018)

Black Mirror: Bandersnatch
Director: David Slade
Writer: Charlie Brooker
Cast: Fionn Whitehead, Craig Parkinson, Alice Lowe, Asim Chaudhry, Will Poulter, Tallulah Haddon, Catriona Knox, Paul Michael Bradley, Jonathan Aris, A.J. Houghton, Fleur Keith, Laura Evelyn, Alan Asaad
Seen on: 28.7.2019
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Plot:
Stefan (Fionn Whitehead) is working on a computer game, an adaptation of the Choose Your Own Adventure novel Bandersnatch, a cult classic. It’s difficult to adapt, but Stefan can convince the people at Tuckersoft to consider releasing it. Tuckersoft is run by Mohan Thakur (Asim Chaudhry) but it’s most famous employee is Colin (Will Poulter). How things go from there depend entirely on what decisions are being made.

Black Mirror: Bandersnatch is a Choose Your Own Adventure film that is very cleverly made. The format here is definitely more important than the story, and so it is that, despite some cool meta stuff, the story falls a little flat. But the format works very well.

The film poster showing a profile shot of Stefan (Fionn Whitehead), white waves moving inward (or outward) over his head.
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Detroit (2017)

Detroit
Director: Kathryn Bigelow
Writer: Mark Boal
Based on: the Algiers Motel Incident
Cast: John BoyegaAlgee SmithAnthony MackieJacob LatimoreJason MitchellKaitlyn DeverHannah Murray, Will Poulter, Jack Reynor, John Krasinski
Seen on: 12.12.2017
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Plot:
1967. After a party in a speakeasy, the (white) police arrests the (black) party goers very publically, leading to protests in the community. During the ensuing riots Larry (Algee Smith) and Fred (Jacob Latimore) stay at the Algiers Motel which is close to the riot area, where the atmosphere is still rather light. But when the police reach the motel, things turn bloody for the guests very quickly.

Detroit is a hard-hitting, very effective film. It’s a film with a lot of weight that impressed me (as a white European) a lot.

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The Revenant (2015)

The Revenant
Director: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Writer: Mark L. Smith, Alejandro González Iñárritu
Based on: Michael Punke‘s novel, a ficitonalized version of Hugh Glass‘ life
Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hardy, Domhnall Gleeson, Will Poulter, Forrest Goodluck, Paul Anderson, Kristoffer Joner, Joshua Burge, Duane Howard, Melaw Nakehk’o, Fabrice Adde
Seen on: 19.1.2016

Plot:
Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio) is guide to a troupe of fur traders/soldiers led by Captain Andrew Henry (Domhnall Gleeson). It’s a dangerous mission which is soon proven by an attack by a group of Arikaras, closing off their planned return route. But the problems don’t end there – Glass himself gets attacked by a bear and only barely escapes with his life. As he is deeply wounded, caring for him would mean risking the lives of all the other men, so Captain Henry asks some to stay behind until Glass passes on, which seems a certainty. shifty Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy) and idealistic Bridger (Will Poulter) stay behind, as well as Glass’ son (and half-Pawnee) Hawk (Forrest Goodluck). But things don’t go as planned: Fitzgerald betrays Glass and Glass, against all odds, suvives and swears to get his revenge.

The Revenant is a good film though I’m not quite as taken with it as everybody else seems to be. Maybe because I’m not a man and this is a film very much concerned with one particular brand of masculinity.

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The Maze Runner (2014)

The Maze Runner
Director: Wes Ball
Writer: Noah Oppenheim, Grant Pierce Myers, T.S. Nowlin
Based on: James Dashner’s novel
Cast: Dylan O’Brien, Ki Hong Lee, Aml Ameen, Blake Cooper, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Will Poulter, Kaya Scodelario, Patricia Clarkson

Plot:
Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) finds himself among a group of other teenage boys in the middle of a maze. He has no memories of his previous life and no idea why he or the other boys are in the maze in the first place – none of them do. But they try their best to solve it and get out of there. But the maze is a dangerous, even deadly place and despite their best attempts to map it, they haven’t been successful so far. And then a mostly unconscious girl (Kaya Scodelario) is delivered to them, causing further confusion.

I was less than enthusiastic about the book and I am not sure whether I was even less enthusiastic about the film, or just equally unimpressed. In any case I was glad I won tickets and didn’t spend any money for it.

themazerunner

[SPOILERS]

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We’re the Millers (2013)

We’re the Millers
Director: Rawson Marshall Thurber
Writer: Bob Fisher, Steve Faber, Sean Anders, John Morris
Cast: Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis, Emma Roberts, Will Poulter, Ed Helms, Nick Offerman, Kathryn Hahn, Molly C. Quinn, Luis Guzmán, Mark L. Young

Plot:
David (Jason Sudeikis) is a drug dealer. When he gets robbed, his boss Brad Gurdlinger (Ed Helms) asks him to go to Mexico and pick up some weed to bring back to the US as repayment. To get across the border unquestioned, David has the idea to get Kenny (Will Poulter), a naive boy who lives in the same building, Casey (Emma Roberts), a young runaway and Rose (Jennifer Aniston), a stripper who also lives in the building, to pose as his family. And so the four find themselves on a road trip that takes some surprising turns.

I hadn’t actually planned to see this film. It didn’t seem like something I was into. But my sister asked me to go with her and, well. And I have to say that the film was not as bad as I thought it would be from the trailer (which featured mainly stripping Jennifer Aniston). It’s not a great movie, but it didn’t hurt to watch it, either.

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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010)

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is the third Narnia movie based on the books by C. S. Lewis [here’y my review of Prince Caspian, and here of the books]. It was directed by Michael Apted and stars Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, Ben Barnes, Will Poulter, Simon Pegg, Liam Neeson and Tilda Swinton.

Plot:
Lucy (Georgie Henley) and Edmund (Skandar Keynes) return to Narnia with their annoying cousin Eustace (Will Poulter) by way of a painting of an ocean that suddenly comes to life. Luckily, Caspian (Ben Barnes) pulls them out of the water and together they search for seven missing knights, soon discovering a much bigger threat.

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is wonderful to look at, though the 3D wasn’t necessary. Unfortunately, it’s the first time in the movies that – as in the books –  the religion completely takes over and ruins the whole thing.

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