The Dark and the Wicked (2020)

The Dark and the Wicked
Director: Bryan Bertino
Writer: Bryan Bertino
Cast: Marin Ireland, Michael Abbott Jr., Xander Berkeley, Lynn Andrews, Julie Oliver-Touchstone, Tom Nowicki
Part of: SLASH Filmfestival
Seen on: 23.9.2020
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Plot:
Louise (Marin Ireland) and Michael (Michael Abbott Jr.) have returned home to their parents’ farm in the middle of nowhere where their father is dying. As he gets weaker by the day, something around the farm seems to get stronger – something dark and twisted that soon seems to take over the farm and the family, becoming ever more threatening.

The Dark and the Wicked annoyed me from, basically, the first minute and we never got past that, the film and I. The longer it went on, the more annoyed I was.

The film poster showing an upside down cross in red brushstokes on a black background. A windmill can be seen inside the cross.
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Proud Mary (2018)

Proud Mary
Director: Babak Najafi
Writer: John Stuart Newman, Christian Swegal, Steve Antin
Cast: Taraji P. Henson, Billy Brown, Jahi Di’Allo Winston, Neal McDonough, Margaret Avery, Xander Berkeley, Rade Serbedzija, Erik LaRay Harvey, Danny Glover
Seen on: 17.7.2018

Plot:
Mary (Taraji P. Henson) is a contract killer and a damn good one. She never had any problems with doing her job but after she shoots Marcus Miller, she discovers that he has a son, Danny (Jahi Di’Allo Winston) – and she finds that she can’t let him go, watching him from afar. Danny’s circumstances haven’t become better since his father’s death. He lives on his own and became involved in drug dealing, working for Uncle (Xander Berkeley). But when things go south on one of his deals, Mary steps in and takes Danny under her wing. The thing is that she does so by upending the entire balance of Boston’s underworld.

I was really looking forward to Proud Mary – and disappointed that it never made it to cinemas in Austria. Now that I’ve seen it, I understand why it was buried, though. It really doesn’t work.

The film poster showing Taraji P. Henson's face in pink-and-white, with characters and scenes from the film arranged around her head to make an afro, also in pink-and-white.
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The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag (1992)

The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag
Director: Allan Moyle
Writer: Grace Cary Bickley
Cast: Penelope Ann Miller, Eric Thal, Alfre Woodard, Julianne Moore, Andy Romano, Ray McKinnon, William Forsythe, Xander Berkeley, Meat Loaf, Catherine Keener
Seen on: 2.4.2018

Plot:
Betty Lou (Penelope Ann Miller) is a librarian, and married to Alex (Eric Thal), a police officer. But Alex and pretty much everyone else is ignoring her. And Betty Lou really doesn’t know how to make somebody pay attention. Not even when she finds a murder weapon is she able to make anybody listen to her. But she has had it and when she accidentally fires the gun herself and is arrested, she confesses to the murder herself. And suddenly all eyes are on her.

The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag is a very, very stupid film that makes absolutely no sense and isn’t funny despite how much it tries to be. It’s a film best forgotten (and it probably would have been already if it wasn’t for Julianne Moore’s small supporting role. At least that’s the reason I know about the film in the first place).

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Re-Watch: Candyman (1992)

Candyman
Director: Bernard Rose
Writer: Bernard Rose
Based on: Clive Barker‘s story The Forbidden
Cast: Virginia Madsen, Tony Todd, Xander Berkeley, Kasi Lemmons, Vanessa Williams
Part of: /slash Filmfestival
Seen on: 24.9.2015
[Reviews by cornholio and Maynard. Plus, my first review.]

Plot:
Helen (Virginia Madsen) wants to write a thesis about urban legends. Among them, the legend of the Candyman: if you say his name five times into the mirror, he will come through it and kill you. Her research takes Helen to a run down apartment complex that have been haunted by a series of murders. Bit by bit Helen comes to believe that the Candyman actually exists.

I already liked Candyman when I saw it the first time, but I think I liked it even better the second time around and I loved getting to see it on a big screen.

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Candyman (1992)

Candyman
Director: Bernard Rose
Writer: Bernard Rose
Based on: Clive Barker‘s story The Forbidden
Cast: Virginia Madsen, Tony Todd, Xander Berkeley, Kasi Lemmons, Vanessa Williams

Plot:
Helen (Virginia Madsen) wants to write a thesis about urban legends. Among them, the legend of the Candyman: if you say his name five times into the mirror, he will come through it and kill you. Her research takes Helen to a run down apartment complex that have been haunted by a series of murders. Bit by bit Helen comes to believe that the Candyman actually exists.

This movie was surprisingly not awful. I mean, it was pretty cheesy and the ending could have been better, but it was tense and it had the most excellent score by Philip Glass. I was caught up in it.

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