Persuasion (1995)

Persuasion
Director: Roger Michell
Writer: Nick Dear
Based on: Jane Austen’s novel
Cast: Amanda Root, Ciarán Hinds, Susan Fleetwood, Corin Redgrave, Fiona Shaw, John Woodvine, Phoebe Nicholls, Samuel West, Sophie Thompson, Judy Cornwell, Simon Russell Beale
Seen on: 27.6.2015

Plot:
Many years ago, Anne Elliot (Amanda Root) was engaged to Frederick Wentworth (Ciarán Hinds), but took the advice of her motherly friend Lady Russell (Susan Fleetwood), as well as listened to the opinions of her father Sir Walter (Corin Redgrave) and her sister Elizabeth (Phoebe Nicholls) and dissolved the engagement since Wentworth didn’t have much standing. Quite by coincidence Frederick is back in her life after years in the Navy and has made a name for himself as well as a fortune. Anne is convinced, though, that he will never forgive her for her past actions. And when her cousin William Elliot (Samuel West) starts courting her, she might be getting another chance, despite being alread 27 years old and still unmarried.

Persuasion was so incredibly nice, I almost burned the cake that I was baking while watching it because I couldn’t bear to leave Anne and Frederick.

persuasion1995 Continue reading

Land and Freedom (1995)

Land and Freedom
Director: Ken Loach
Writer: Jim Allen
Cast: Ian Hart, Rosana Pastor, Icíar Bollaín, Tom Gilroy, Marc Martínez, Frédéric Pierrot
Seen on: 17.03.2015

Plot:
After the death of her grandfather, Kim (Suzanne Maddock) finds a box with letters and a red handkerchief filled with earth. Kim starts to piece together the years just before the Second World War started in the life of her grandfather: David (Ian Hart) is unemployed and very political. Since he feels that he can’t further the communist cause in the UK, he decides to leave Liverpool and head to Spain to fight the fascists. He joins one of the paramilitary groups, the POUM and starts fighting after a very short training. But his idealism and the idealism of his co-fighters is tested in many ways.

Land and Freedom was not so much a great film, as a great political discussion caught on camera. I really enjoyed it, especially since I’m being pushed further on further left with every day that passes. (You’d think that I’d be getting mellower with age, but screw that. You’d also think that you’d grow more cynical and less idealistic with age, but screw that even harder.)

landandfreedom Continue reading

Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995)

Die Hard: With a Vengeance
Director: John McTiernan
Writer: Jonathan Hensleigh
Sequel to: Die Hard, Die Hard 2
Cast: Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, Jeremy Irons, Graham Greene

Plot:
A bomb goes off in New York, and a little bit later the police get a call from Simon (Jeremy Irons) who says that he’ll set off another if they don’t get John McClane (Bruce Willis) to do as he says. And the first exercise is that he has to go to Harlem with a sign with a racial slur on it. In Harlem, Zeus (Samuel L. Jackson) saves his ass and from then on, Simon tells both Zeus and John what to do. They only have a limited amount of time to figure out Simon’s plan before he blows the next bit up.

Now, Die Hard: With a Vengeance I enjoyed a whole lot. Where I had problems getting into the first two films, everything came together in this one. And it’s fun.

Die-hard-with-a-vengeance

Continue reading

Strange Days (1995)

[Part of the Science Fiction special in the Vienna Filmmuseum.]

Strange Days is a film by Kathryn Bigelow, starring Ralph Fiennes, Angela Bassett, Juliette Lewis, Tom Sizemore, Michael Wincott, Vincent D’Onofrio, William Fichtner.

Plot:
1999: Lenny (Ralph Fiennes) is a former cop who now makes his money by selling discs that can be inserted into the so-called SQUIDs: machines that can record everything a person experiences and can play it back to somebody else so that they experience it themselves. These recordings are illegal, and often record illegal things happening. Lenny’s life is pretty pathetic, he barely makes enough money to survive and he still dreams of his ex-girlfriend Faith (Juliette Lewis). The only constants in his life are his friends Max (Tom Sizemore) and Mace (Angela Bassett). In the middle of the world preparing for the new millenium, Lenny stumbles upon a conspiracy somehow involving Faith.

Strange Days is a pretty fantastic movie. The cast is great, the ideas interesting and even though the camera moves practically all the time, it never gets too shaky. The weakest point is the script, though – the big twist at the end is way too obvious, most of the characters are a little flimsy and the dialogue hurts a bit sometimes.

Continue reading

Re-Watch: Clueless (1995)

And coming to a final stop in the big EmmaAdaptationWatching-and-Comparing, we got Clueless, Amy Heckerling‘s modernised adaptation of Jane Austen‘s novel, starring Alicia Silverstone, Stacey Dash, Brittany Murphy, Paul Rudd, Donald Faison, Breckin Meyer and Jeremy Sisto.

Plot:
Cher (Alicia Silverstone) is a rich LA teenager whose life revolves around her clothes and her friends, most of all Dionne (Stacey Dash). When Cher gets bad grades in her debate class, she decides to set up two of her teachers – Mr Hall (Wallace Shawn) and Miss Geist (Twink Caplan). And since she enjoys playing the matchmaker, she decides to set up the new girl Tai (Brittany Murphy) as well.

I love this movie so much, I can’t even tell you. This migh taint my judgment, but I think it’s pretty much perfect – funny, intelligent and sweet. The only fault I can find with it is that it doesn’t credit Austen at all. [It’s just different enough to not make it completely indecent, but still.]

Continue reading