Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is the first novel by Mary Shelley.
Finished on: 17.1.2019
[Here are my reviews of various Frankenstein adaptations.]

Plot:
Victor Frankenstein has always been interested in the natural sciences, although it all started with alchemy for him. After his mother’s death, he buries himself in his work as a student of chemistry. He experiments with reanimation and actually manages to bring a creature to life. But the creature is scary and ugly and Victor abandons him. The creature has to find his own way in the world.

Frankenstein is a beautiful, albeit lengthy novel that is definitely a classic for a very good reason. Still, I have to admit that what I loved most about it is, weirdly enough, the author’s introduction.

The book cover showing the painting of a naked man huddling on the floor.
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Mary Shelley (2017)

Mary Shelley
Director: Haifaa Al-Mansour
Writer: Emma Jensen, Haifaa Al-Mansour
Cast: Elle Fanning, Douglas Booth, Bel Powley, Tom Sturridge, Joanne Froggatt, Stephen Dillane, Maisie Williams, Derek Riddell, Hugh O’Conor, Ben Hardy
Seen on: 9.1.2019
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Plot:
Mary (Elle Fanning) is the daughter of two authors, William Godwin (Stephen Dillane) and Mary Wollstonecraft. Her mother, unfortunately passed early and her father’s new wife (Joanne Froggatt) is not easy on her, leaving Mary at even more of a loss than your average 16-year-old. That’s when she meets Percy (Douglas Booth), a charming poet who intrigues her. They fall in love and together with Mary’s stepsister Claire Clairmont (Bel Powley) they run away to Geneva to meet Lord Byron (Tom Sturridge) and Polidori (Ben Hardy). The five of them spend an intense time together – a time that includes a literary contest that pushes Mary to write her first novel, Frankenstein.

Mary Shelley, unfortunately, didn’t really come together, although I am uncertain what went wrong here – they had all the right ingredients to make a feast and ended with a slightly bland meal that didn’t sate. (I promise I won’t be stretching this metaphor any further.)

The film poster showing half of Mary's (Elle Fanning) face.
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Victor Frankenstein (2015)

Victor Frankenstein
Director: Paul McGuigan
Writer: Max Landis
Based on: Mary Shelley‘s novel
Cast: Daniel RadcliffeJames McAvoy, Jessica Brown Findlay, Bronson Webb, Daniel Mays, Andrew Scott, Freddie Fox, Charles Dance, Mark Gatiss
Part of: Fright Nights
Seen on: 12.5.2016

Plot:
Igor (Daniel Radcliffe) works in a circus as a clown. Due to his hump, he is decried as a freak and mistreated at every turn. People certainly aren’t seeing his medical talent, even though they are okay with him treating them. Things change drastically for Igor, when Victor Frankenstein (James McAvoy) turns up in his circus one night. Victor realizes how much of a diamond in the rough Igor is, helps him to flee, cures him of his hump and enlists him in his own experiments: Victor is set on freeing the world from death itself.

How many Frankenstein adaptations does the world need? No matter, there’s always one more. Victor Frankenstein isn’t a particularly good one at that, but I’m pretty damn sure it is the gayest one in existence. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen gay porn that wasn’t that homoerotically charged. And that did make it pretty fun to watch.

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Frankenstein (2015)

Frankenstein
Director: Bernard Rose
Writer: Bernard Rose
Based on: Mary Shelley‘s novel
Cast: Xavier Samuel, Carrie-Anne Moss, Danny Huston, Tony Todd
Part of: /slash Filmfestival
Seen on: 24.9.2015
[Reviews by cornholio and Maynard.]

Plot:
Viktor (Danny Huston) and Elizabeth (Carrie-Anne Moss) have been working on artificial life for a while and they finally seem to have made it: their specimen (Xavier Samuel) fulfills all expectations, but it is not quite stable yet. As tumors start to take it over, Viktor and Elizabeth decide to put it down. But it manages to escape its own death sentence. Unleashed in the world far from laboratories, it starts looking for a place where it can stay and fit in.

Frankenstein is a very clever new take on a story that sometimes feels done to death. But I’m not sure whether it doesn’t ultimately undermine its own attempts as well. Be that as it may, it is certainly worth checking out.

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Frankenstein

Frankenstein
Director: Danny Boyle
Writer: Nick Dear
Based on: Mary Shelley‘s novel
Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Jonny Lee Miller, Ella SmithKarl Johnson, Naomie Harris
[I saw the version with Benedict Cumberbatch as Victor Frankenstein and Jonny Lee Miller as the Creature way back when. This time I saw the vice versa version.]

Plot:
Victor Frankenstein (Jonny Lee Miller) experimented around and managed to create a man (Benedict Cumberbatch). Horrified by what he’s done, he leaves the Creature to his own devices. As he stumbles through the world, utterly forsaken, the Creature tries to find his place in the world, a place that is inexorably connected to the man who created him.

It was fascinating to see both versions of the play – and to notice the way my perception shifted just by switching the roles and even though everything else stayed the same. But seeing the play for a second time also made its faults much clearer to me – and that is especially the way it treats its women.

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I, Frankenstein (2014)

I, Frankenstein
Director: Stuart Beattie
Writer: Stuart Beattie
Based on: Kevin Grevioux‘s comic, which is in turn based on Mary Shelley‘s novel
Cast: Aaron Eckhart, Yvonne Strahovski, Miranda Otto, Bill Nighy, Jai Courtney, Caitlin Stasey, Mahesh Jadu, Kevin Grevioux

Plot:
Shortly after the death of his creator, Frankenstein’s creature (Aaron Eckhart) is attacked by demons who seem to need him for something. The creature is saved by Gargoyle Angel Warriors who see his potential as a fighter and want to recruit him for their order. But even though the Gargoyle Queen Leonore (Miranda Otto) gives him his name – Adam – and treats him more like a human than anybody did before, he is not persuaded. But when things continue to get worse, Adam has a choice to make.

I, Frankenstein is an incredibly bad film. But it hits the exact sweet spot between bad and good: the spot of craptacular, shitmazing and so bad it’s good. If you have any love for bad films, I, Frankenstein will give you exactly what you need.

i-frankenstein

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Frankenstein

Frankenstein
Director: Danny Boyle
Writer: Nick Dear
Based on: Mary Shelley‘s novel
Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Jonny Lee Miller, Ella SmithKarl Johnson, Naomie Harris
[I saw the version with Benedict Cumberbatch as Victor Frankenstein and Jonny Lee Miller as the Creature. But there’s also a vice versa version.]

Plot:
Victor Frankenstein (Benedict Cumberbatch) experimented around and managed to create a man (Jonny Lee Miller). Horrified by what he’s done, he leaves the Creature to his own devices. As he stumbles through the world, utterly forsaken, the Creature tries to find his place in the world, a place that is inexorably connected to the man who created him.

Frankenstein was an excellent production that looked great, was entertaining and very well-made. It has one big fault though, in the shape of a completely unnecessary rape scene.

Frankenstein

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