John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

John Wick: Chapter 2
Director: Chad Stahelski
Writer: Derek Kolstad
Sequel to: John Wick
Cast: Keanu Reeves, Riccardo Scamarcio, Ian McShane, Ruby Rose, Common, Claudia Gerini, Lance Reddick, Laurence Fishburne, Tobias Segal, John Leguizamo, Bridget Moynahan, Thomas Sadoski, Erik Frandsen, David Patrick Kelly, Perry Yung, Peter Serafinowicz, Peter Stormare
Seen on: 22.2.2017

Plot:
After John Wick (Keanu Reeves) finished his quest of vengeance and made sure that there will be no continuation of a blood feud, all he wants is to get back to his life of peace and quiet. But his reappearance in the world of assassins hasn’t gone unnoticed and there is still a debt John owes to Santino (Riccardo Scarmarcio) – and Santino has come to collect. John wants to refuse, but if he does, he goes against one of the central principles of this world – and his life will be up for grabs.

John Wick: Chapter 2 may not have blown me away quite as much as the first film (which may be due mostly to my higher expectations now), but it is definitely a more than worthy sequel.

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Clown (2014)

Clown
Director: Jon Watts
Writer: Jon Watts, Christopher D. Ford
Cast: Andy Powers, Peter Stormare, Laura Allen, Elizabeth Whitmere, Christian Distefano, (imdb says that Eli Roth played Frowny, but I don’t think that’s actually the case)
Part of: Secret Society Screening at the /slash Filmfestival
Seen on: 27.9.2015
[Reviews by cornholio and Maynard.]

Plot:
Kent (Andy Powers) and his wife Meg (Laura Allen) have organized a clown for their son’s birthday party. But that clown cancels and they are left in quite a bind. Real estate agent Kent finds a clown costume in one of the houses he is supposed to sell and decides to put it on to make his son happy, which works like a charm. But when he tries to take it off again, he is unable to do so. The costumes seems to be doing something to him.

Clowns is built on a nice idea and excellent make-up, but storywise it did start to drag. Maybe if clowns were scarier for me, I would have been more into the film. But as is, I thought it was rather average and it left me quite cold.

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Every Thing Will Be Fine (2015)

Every Thing Will Be Fine
Director: Wim Wenders
Writer: Bjørn Olaf Johannessen
Cast: James Franco, Rachel McAdams, Charlotte GainsbourgMarie-Josée Croze, Peter Stormare, Patrick Bauchau, Julia Sarah Stone, Robert Naylor
Seen on: 9.4.2015

Plot:
Tomas (James Franco) is trying to write his newest book. That attempt includes staying in a trailer on a frozen lake and hours of driving around the countryside, leading to more than one fight with his girlfriend Sara (Rachel McAdams). On one of his drives, Tomas hits and kills a little boy, which leaves both him and the boy’s mother Kate (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and brother Christopher (Jack Fulton/Philippe Vanasse-Paquet/Robert Naylor) reeling. Will every thing ever be fine for them again?

Every Thing Will Be Fine is a calm, beautiful movie that manages to be completely intimate, despite spanning several years and some rather difficult topics. I really loved it.

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Re-Watch: Fargo (1996)

Fargo
Director: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Writer: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Cast: William H. Macy, Steve Buscemi, Peter StormareFrances McDormandJohn Carroll Lynch, Kristin Rudrüd, Harve Presnell, Tony Denman, Steve Reevis, Larry Brandenburg
Seen on: 15.3.2015

Plot:
Jerry Lundegaard (William H. Macy) has a business plan and a foolproof way of getting the money for it: he hires Carl (Steve Buscemi) and Gaear (Peter Stormare) to kidnap his wife (Kristin Rudrüd) and extort money from his father-in-law Wade (Harve Presnell). But even before they can act out the plan, things start going wrong and pregnant police woman Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) takes up the investigation.

I haven’t seen Fargo in so long that I still watched it in German the last time I saw it (I’ve avoided dubbed films for about 15 years now). I still remembered the film quite well and I still love it. It’s just a wonderful black comedy.

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Autumn Blood (2013)

Autumn Blood
Director: Markus Blunder
Writer: Stephen T. Barton, Markus Blunder
Cast: Sophie Lowe, Peter Stormare, Maximilian Harnisch, Annica McCrudden, Gustaf Skarsgård, Samuel Vauramo, Tim Morten Uhlenbrock
Seen on: 15.3.2015
[Screener Review.]

[Trigger Warning: Rape.]

Plot:
A remote mountain village. An even more remote farm. Here, a girl (Sophie Lowe) and her little brother (Maximilian Harnisch) live with their ill mother (Jacqueline Le Saunier) rather innocently – but only until their mother finally succumbs to her sickness. The children decide to keep the death to themselves, so that they don’t have to leave their home, even though the girl has barely left childhood behind herself. But that is no obstacle for the Hunter (Samuel Vauramo) who brutally rapes her – and then even returns with the Butcher (Gustaf Skarsgård) and a friend (Tim Morten Uhlenbrock).

Autumn Blood has “concept film” stamped on it in big letters and it worked better as a concept than an actual film. It did have great cinematography, though.

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The Zero Theorem (2013)

The Zero Theorem
Director: Terry Gilliam
Writer: Pat Rushin
Cast: Christoph Waltz, Lucas HedgesDavid ThewlisMélanie ThierryMatt DamonGwendoline ChristieRupert FriendRay CooperLily ColeSanjeev BhaskarPeter StormareBen WhishawTilda Swinton

Plot:
Qohen Leth (Christoph Waltz) works as an entity cruncher for a huge corporation. The hours away from home are torture for Qohen as he is waiting for a call, so he has been trying to convince the corporation that he could work from home. When his supervisor Joby (David Thewlis) tells him that Management (Matt Damon) will be at his party, Qohen decides that he has to go there and talk to him. And he actually succeeds in that plan and a little while later, he starts working on the Zero Theorem from home.

Gilliam knows how to make a world look cool and a film look pretty. The cast is wonderful, too. Other than that though, the film is a boring, sexist mess.

the-zero-theorem

 

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Bad Milo! (2013)

Bad Milo!
Director: Jacob Vaughan
Writer: Jacob Vaughan, Benjamin Hayes
Cast: Ken Marino, Gillian Jacobs, Mary Kay Place, Claudia Choi, Patrick Warburton, Peter Stormare
Part of: /slash Filmfestival [Though I got so drunk during Sharknado that during the Festival proper I barely saw anything of the film and had to re-watch it later.]

Plot:
Duncan (Ken Marino) has stomach issues which are only made worse by an unwanted promotion, his family’s pressure to have kids with his wife Sarah (Gillian Jacobs) for which he feels entirely unready and the therapist (Peter Stormare) Sarah mostly talked him into seeing. But the stress really only starts when he finds out that his stomach issues are actually a demon living in his bowels.

Bad Milo! was nice but it didn’t blow me away. It had some funny moments but mostly it just kind of ambled along and didn’t move me much in any direction.

badmilo

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Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters (2013)

Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters
Director: Tommy Wirkola
Writer: Tommy Wirkola
Cast: Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Famke Janssen, Peter Stormare, Pihla Viitala, Thomas Mann, Joanna Kulig, Ingrid Bolsø Berdal

Plot:
Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and Gretel (Gemma Arterton) have been witch hunters ever since they were imprisoned by a witch, when they were kids, but were able to free themselves by killing her. Hansel and Gretel come to Augsburg, where a lot of children have gone missing, suggesting that a lot of witch activity is going on in the area. But when they start to hunt them down, they stumble upon an even bigger event than they anticipated.

Hansel & Gretel has SO MANY ISSUES. It is one of the most stupid, absurd films I have ever seen. It is at the same time offensive to human beings as a whole, and hilarious as hell.

kinopoisk.ru

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Isolerad [Corridor] (2010)

Isolerad
Director: Johan Lundborg, Johan Storm
Writer: Johan Lundborg, Johan Storm
Cast: Emil Johnsen, Ylva Gallon, Peter Stormare

Plot:
Frank (Emil Johnsen) is a withdrawn, if not to say phobic, student who spends most of his time when he’s not in class studying. When Lotte (Ylva Gallon) moves into the apartment above his, she disrupts his routine – first by just not leaving Frank alone, then by having loud sex with her boyfriend Micke (Peter Stormare). But when it turns out that Micke abuses Lotte, Frank gets drawn more into the events than he would like.

The first half of Corridor is pretty great – tense and claustrophobic in a weirdly nice way. But then the plotting gets a little improbable and that pulled me out of the film. It didn’t completely fall apart, but it did make for a weaker second half.

isolerad

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Re-Watch: Unknown (2006)

Unknown
Director: Simon Brand
Writer: Matthew Waynee
Cast: Jim Caviezel, Greg Kinnear, Jeremy Sisto, Barry Pepper, Joe Pantoliano, Bridget Moynahan, Peter Stormare, Chris Mulkey, Clayne Crawford, Kevin Chapman, Mark Boone Junior

Plot:
Five men wake up one by one in a locked warehouse. None of them can remember who they are or how they got there. The first to wake up is Jean Jacket (Jim Caviezel). As he looks around he sees a guy with a broken nose (Greg Kinnear), one tied to a chair (Joe Pantoliano), one handcuffed to a rail in obviously very hurt (Jeremy Sisto) and one apparently simply passed out (Barry Pepper). While everybody else is still out cold, Jean Jacket wanders around and receives a phone call through which he fakes his way through. But it is obvious that something shifty is going on and Jean Jacket and everybody else have to figure out what it is and what side they’re on.

I started this movie under the impression that I hadn’t seen it before, but about five minutes in I realized that I had, actually. I couldn’t remember practically anything about it, though – it’s that kind of a movie.

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