Mary Shelley (2017)

Mary Shelley
Director: Haifaa Al-Mansour
Writer: Emma Jensen, Haifaa Al-Mansour
Cast: Elle Fanning, Douglas Booth, Bel Powley, Tom Sturridge, Joanne Froggatt, Stephen Dillane, Maisie Williams, Derek Riddell, Hugh O’Conor, Ben Hardy
Seen on: 9.1.2019
1-gif-review

Plot:
Mary (Elle Fanning) is the daughter of two authors, William Godwin (Stephen Dillane) and Mary Wollstonecraft. Her mother, unfortunately passed early and her father’s new wife (Joanne Froggatt) is not easy on her, leaving Mary at even more of a loss than your average 16-year-old. That’s when she meets Percy (Douglas Booth), a charming poet who intrigues her. They fall in love and together with Mary’s stepsister Claire Clairmont (Bel Powley) they run away to Geneva to meet Lord Byron (Tom Sturridge) and Polidori (Ben Hardy). The five of them spend an intense time together – a time that includes a literary contest that pushes Mary to write her first novel, Frankenstein.

Mary Shelley, unfortunately, didn’t really come together, although I am uncertain what went wrong here – they had all the right ingredients to make a feast and ended with a slightly bland meal that didn’t sate. (I promise I won’t be stretching this metaphor any further.)

The film poster showing half of Mary's (Elle Fanning) face.
Continue reading

Darkest Hour (2017)

Darkest Hour
Director: Joe Wright
Writer: Anthony McCarten
Cast: Gary Oldman, Kristin Scott Thomas, Ben Mendelsohn, Lily James, Ronald Pickup, Stephen Dillane, David Strathairn
Seen on: 25.1.2018
1-gif-review

Plot:
Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) just became Prime Minister of the UK and he already has a huge decision to make: should he enter into peace negotiations with Nazi Germany or should he refuse any kind of arrangement with them, even if that means waging war against them? With less than enthusiastic support from the most powerful people around him, Churchill tries to make his decision.

To put it plainly, Darkest Hour is not a good film. Maybe it would have stood a chance with another (better) script, but what we got is just insufferable

Continue reading

Zero Dark Thirty (2012)

Zero Dark Thirty
Director: Kathryn Bigelow
Writer: Mark Boal
Cast: Jessica Chastain, Jason Clarke, Kyle Chandler, Jennifer Ehle, Harold Perrineau, Scott Adkins, Mark Strong, Édgar Ramírez, Mark Duplass, James Gandolfini, Stephen Dillane, John Barrowman, Joel Edgerton, Chris Pratt, Taylor Kinney

Plot:
Maya (Jessica Chastain) works for the CIA and has just been sent to Pakistan. Her mission is to find out where Osama bin Laden is hiding. A mission that takes her from torturing prisoners under the the tutelage of colleauge Dan (Jason Clarke) to plain old research. When she stumbles across the name of a guy she believes is a close collaborator of bin Laden, she becomes obsessed with finding him as the most direct way to bin Laden himself.

I really did my best to be interested in this film. Admittedly, the topic is not so much my cup of tea, but it is important. Unfortunately the movie is so very boring that, with the best of motivation, it was impossible to keep up the interest. I mean, I know they searched for this guy a very long time – but was it really necessary that the audience feels every minute of that 10-year-search? At some point I just gave up and fell asleep for a little while – just to get away from the boredom of it all for a bit.

zero-dark-thirty

Continue reading

Klimt (2006)

Klimt is Raoul Ruiz‘ kinda-biopic of Gustav Klimt, starring John Malkovich, Veronica Ferres, Stephen Dillane, Saffron Burrows and Nikolai Kinski.

Plot:
Gustav Klimt (John Malkovich) is dying. He gets a visit from Egon Schiele (Nikolai Kinski) and together they delve into Klimt’s feverish subconscious to explore his life, his work and his relationships.

Holy bloody shit, this movie is a mess. The concept might – might – have worked, if the movie wasn’t so damn conscious [and kinda smugly self-congratulatory] about every little thing it did. Also, it was a bit ridiculous.

Continue reading